Archive | January, 2011

Movie Magic

27 Jan

This is the very first scene that you will see when you watch our Kick Starter video. A stop motion introduction to Rainbow Lightning…. Que the marching music!

Dear Kickstarter, we are kicking and screaming

27 Jan

Sometimes I’m indecisive. Actually, I can’t really even decide if I should say sometimes or all the times, but I’m pretty sure the times I’m indecisive outweigh the times I know with all certainty of anything. In this case, Erica and I are kicking and screaming and writing for Kickstarter. I don’t know why I loathe the artist statement. I guess I feign to be diagramatic I prefer space and observation. But how do other people see it? Do they prefer close up or far away descriptions? Personally, I always prefer to take at least three to five steps back from where I think the details are. The sense of claustrophobia disappears.
I am definitely not claustrophobic. I mean we are making a big cave. But I like space when it comes to being particular. If I could, I would blow a big tough bubblegum bubble with helium and send myself upwards, take a vacay from the miopic- where macro explanations abound . So- here goes- this is what we have so far to give to Kickstarter. Feel free to comment:
‘One day we were having a moment where we were sharing our memories and past and talking about how memories and past shapes who we are but it also shapes who we aren’t. The thing we both find so fascinating is that, although we all have our own unique histories the human experience is universal- but for some reason, it is the least talked about thing among people. These deep caverns of our psyche’s is where everyone’s personal dreamcatcher lies and collects unanswered calls for hope, personal truths and manifested dreams.  Conscious experiences belong to slipstreams of awareness, and these streams are part of nature’s process.
In stories, wishes etc. We try to depict this inner sanctum, and transformative process in the gallery. A nostalgiac landscape much like a secret cave or nest, is our a fantasy adaptation of nature that is like our psyche’s a dream catcher. We took inspiration from cocoons, and the nostalgiac nature of symbols, clothing and objects The hidden ground of our experiences is the deep source of our inspiration and transformation. In the safe nest of the space we provide an environment for people to embrace paradox and contradiction- good and evil, life and death, hope and despair. Embroidered on the fabric walls and ceiling of the cave are a narrative depiction of collected bits of memories and wishes that we have been and are collecting from people. But the wishing hasn’t stopped we are currently collecting wishes- and will be throughout the show- Wishes can be left in the cave in exchange for a handcrafted geode which are interactive and uncovered by cracking and unraveling through it’s fabric and wax encasement. This serves as a souvenier- as proof- a flagship- of your own vulnerable intention set in the deep psyche crazy art house cave thing installation we made.

 

The materials we work with are common items and vary based on what is available to us. Although, a lot of them are gotten via thrifting and dumpster diving and donations- there is still much scavenging that needs done. Some things just arent’ free. We still need hot glue, embroidery supplies, housepaint, …… Not to mention a two week period where we take time away from our full time jobs to install in the gallery.’

OH DEar readers: So what do you think?  I REALLYY REALLY REALLY NEED YR HELP

Get tribal-get open

20 Jan

Sometimes someone just hits the nail on the head- as much as I wish it was always me, I just have to put up this post- in lieu of Tribal Writers newest post-“How to be a creative badass.” Tribal writer Justine Musk is a contemporary heroine.

This is her 12 point plan.

1. Live for the process

(that’s how you lose yourself & find your best work)

When we focus on the process instead of the end result, we’re more likely to reach flow. Otherwise known as being “in the zone”, flow is a state of mind in which we lose all sense of self-consciousness and lock in on the task at hand. When we’re in flow, we are…better. More focused, more creative, more skilled. It’s when we do our best work, and grow toward new capabilities.

2. Give it away

(so they can’t live without it)

Seth Godin writes in LINCHPIN: “…the real magic is the leverage this expansion adds, not the loss of commerce it causes. When you have more friends in the core circle, more people with whom to share your art, your art is amplified and can have more power.”

Russell Simmons dedicates a chapter to this idea in his new book SUPER RICH: “…the best way to get a [record] deal is to forget about the labels and instead just start giving away your music for free…Never pass up any opportunity to share your gift with the world…[The labels are] going to want to find the person who’s generating much love and enthusiasm. And when they find you, they’re going to reward you…more handsomely than if you had come to them begging for a deal.”

3. Work your ass off

(baby, you’ve got to ship)

The more blog posts you write, the better chance you have of writing one that goes viral. The more stories you write, the more paintings you paint, the more companies you dream up: not only will you develop your voice and improve at whatever it is that you do, you increase your own chances of success.

Obviously you don’t want to sacrifice quality for quantity. You need instruction, feedback, the tough love of intelligent constructive criticism: fold all of this into your process. And then work it.

4. Tell the truth

(truth is beauty & power)

Telling the truth is about paying close attention to your own strengths and interests instead of just chasing the marketplace. It’s about speaking in your own voice. When you tell the truth – your truth – you infuse your work with soul and originality. And because it’s truth, it will resonate with others. People will find you unique, but still be able to relate. They might even feel like you’re speaking their own truth in a way that they can’t, or didn’t even know to do.

That’s powerful stuff.

5. Follow your instincts

(they know more than you do)

Howard Gardner put forward the idea of multiple intelligences, some of which are nonverbal. Scientists have discovered that neural intelligence doesn’t just exist in the brain, but also in the body: your heart, your gut. Your intelligence is more complex and complicated than you probably think, and it is constantly absorbing and processing information on an unconscious level. Intuition is a form of nonverbal intelligence, and it’s not just women who have it. Pay attention to it.

6. Be vulnerable

(you connect when you’re authentic)

To produce good work, you need to dive beneath the surface of things. You need to “go there” in a way that we specifically train ourselves not to do in day-to-day life. We believe that if we reveal too much, we’ll expose ourselves as unworthy. Shameful. But it’s shame that keeps us isolated, silent, and disconnected from each other. Part of believing that you have something to say is flying in the face of all that. When you lean into what discomforts you, what scares you, you’re getting to the good, original stuff.

Hey. If it was easy, then everybody would do it. And do it well.

7. Know yourself

(play to your strengths)

When you know yourself, you can figure out how to play to your strengths and navigate your weaknesses. Your strengths are the things that make you feel rejuvenated and powerful , not necessarily what you’re already good at. (You might be good at accounting. That doesn’t mean it fills you with a zest for life.) By cultivating your strengths, you can lose yourself in the process (see #1) and get better and better and better at specific things until no one can deny how freaking remarkable you are. If you are a writer with a strength for plotting, you might produce the next bestselling thriller. Or if your strengths are for prose and character, you might develop into the next prize-winning literary short-story writer.

8. Love the world

(makes you healthier & more creative)

Hate and bitterness are unproductive. Hate destroys and contracts; love builds and expands. Be a builder. Much more fun that way. We only have so much attention to put on the world; put yours on what you love. Let the rest fade into the background.

9. Value stillness

(that’s where ideas live)

When you slow down your brainwaves, you literally downshift into a very different state of mind. Day-to-day life requires us to be alert and vigilant in a way that is not conducive to creativity. To create, you want to access the deeper, more unconscious parts of your intelligence. You want to let your mind roam freely to make new connections, factor in new bits of information, find new relationships between them. It’s why daydreaming is linked to creativity. It’s why Einstein believed in taking lots of naps. It’s why meditation is a force of good. You’ve got to let your brain out of its practical, everyday cage.

10. Make mistakes

(the real art grows out of them)

Give yourself permission to make mistakes. The best and fastest way to get better at anything is through something called deliberate practice, which requires (among other things) that you work at the limit of your abilities. When you make mistakes, your brain is forced to slow down, pay attention, and process what you did wrong. This is how we learn.

Not to mention, sometimes the mistakes can spark off new insights and directions of their own.

11. Get open

(let the world in)

‘Get open’ is a hip-hop phrase that I picked up from Russell Simmons: it means “losing your inhibitions, or letting down your defenses…You want to always be as open, creative and fluid as possible, and never become rigid, old, or tight. The freedom you experience when you’re open is where all the positive change in your life will emanate from.” Amen.

12. Remember that we are stronger for the broken places.

(you are worthy)

Every scar has a story behind it. Tell yours with pride.

Stop Motion Sunday with Big Mamma Rainbows!

17 Jan

15 Jan

Some inspiration from creators of worlds!

14 Jan

PIP AND POP

(aka Tanya Schultz and Nicole Andrijevic)

Two Ladies from Perth Australia making sugary landscape figments reality! Total eye candy, total inspiration, total totality.

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